On Going to Therapy During a Humanitarian Crisis

On Going to Therapy During a Humanitarian Crisis

Something I hear over and over again from clients is, “It feels so selfish for me to worry about myself when other people have it worse,” or, “Well, I know I really shouldn’t feel this way when other people are suffering more.”  Some variation of this has come up dozens, maybe hundreds of times in the years I’ve been practicing, and before that, it was something I ran up against on a personal level.

Caroline's Story: Breaking Down the Mental Health Stigma

Caroline's Story: Breaking Down the Mental Health Stigma

And then people started telling me I might be depressed. I knew it might be true, but I didn’t want to believe it. I’d never had health issues. I broke my arm at age one when I fell out of my stroller, and I had my wisdom teeth taken out at age 18, but those were my only interactions with the medical system aside from routine checkups and vaccinations. Confronted with my own possible mental health issue, I had no idea what I should do.

Max's Story

Max's Story

I used to think therapy was for more serious cases, like depression or if you can’t handle the stress of something. I thought you had to specifically be struggling to be happy in everyday life. That wasn’t me.

But in my first session, I found just by talking and thinking about what’s going on internally, I learned more about how I functioned. It was interesting to try and describe to my therapist who I am.